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Overview

Biomedical Science is the in-depth study of human biology in both normal and disease states.

This course provides you with detailed understanding of the causes of human disease, how these produce symptoms and the effects of disease on the structure and function of human cells, tissues, and the whole organism. Students learn both current techniques used in the study of human diseases in the NHS, and innovative technologies under development for experimental treatments.

The University of Bradford is in the top 50 universities for research in the latest Research Excellence Framework, with world class researchers undertaking the research-informed teaching.

Recent investment in the Digital Health Zone allows students to access the latest techniques in digital anatomy and pathology, including carrying out digital dissection.

Professional accreditation

The course is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS).

Entry requirements

 

Typical offer – 120 UCAS tariff points.

We take into consideration a number of factors when assessing your application. It’s not just about your grades; we take the time to understand your personal circumstances and make decisions based on your potential to thrive at university and beyond.

A levels

To include either A-level Biology or Chemistry at grade B or above.

Please note that where a science A-level is taken, the University will require applicants to pass the practical element (for A-levels awarded from August 2017 onwards).

BTEC Extended Diploma

DDD in the BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science to include six of the following optional units passed at Merit:

  • Physiology of Human Body Systems
  • Human Regulation and Reproduction
  • Biological Molecules and Metabolic Pathways
  • Genetics and Genetic Engineering
  • Diseases and Infections
  • Applications of Inorganic Chemistry
  • Applications of Organic Chemistry
  • Microbiology and Microbiological Techniques
  • Industrial Chemical Reactions
  • Practical Chemical Analysis
  • Biomedical Science

Applicants on Access Programmes

122 UCAS tariff points. Applicants must be studying an Access to Higher Education Diploma in a Science subject and achieve a minimum of 12 credits of Biology or Chemistry at Distinction.

International Baccalaureate requirements

120 UCAS tariff points to include HL Chemistry or Biology at grade 6, 1 other subject at grade 6 and a third subject at grade 5.

Plus HL 3 or SL 4 in Maths and English Language and Literature A or English B.

Plus minimum of

GCSE English, Mathematics and two Sciences at grade C or 4 (equivalents accepted).

English language requirements

Minimum IELTS at 6.0 or the equivalent.

If you do not meet the IELTS requirement, you can take a University of Bradford pre-sessional English course.

CIFS entry requirement

If you are an International student and do not meet the entry requirements for direct entry onto this course you may be interested in our Certificate of International Foundation Studies

80 UCAS points or equivalent (see individual country pages for details) plus Maths and 2 Science qualifications equivalent to GCSE Grade C.

UKVI approved IELTS of 5.0 overall with no sub-test less than 5.0.

CIFS modules to be taken

Students study the four core modules plus ONE from the following modules:

  • Foundation in Human Biology
  • Foundation in Chemistry

And ONE additional module from the following:

  • Foundation in Human Biology
  • Foundation in Chemistry
  • Introduction to the Social Sciences
  • Global Business Environment
  • Foundation Mathematics 2

Progression requirements for degree programme

An overall average of at least 60%

and at least 55% in Foundation in Chemistry OR Foundation in Human Biology

Course Content

This programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) giving you a broad-based scientific education coupled with the technical skills necessary for laboratory work. This broad-based education provides the foundation for a wide-range of scientific careers, including as a Biomedical Scientist in a hospital environment (after successful completion of the IBMS portfolio of competence in an accredited laboratory placement and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council after graduation), as a laboratory-based or non-laboratory based scientist in the Pharmaceutical Industry and other related industries, academic research and teaching.

However, whilst the degree provides a qualification necessary to start your professional career you will need to continue to develop skills throughout your working life. This programme couples a scientific education with the development of the skills necessary for lifelong learning.

All module information is for 2019 entry, and is subject to change.

First year

Core

Developing Professional Skills 1 (BIS4003-B)

Cell and Tissue Biology (BIS4008-B)

Human Physiology (BIS4009-B)

Human Genetics and Developmental Biology (BIS4010-B)

Introductory Biochemistry (BIS4007-B)

Introductory Microbiology (BIS4013-B)

Second year

Core

Developing Professional Skills 2 (BIS5003-B)

Immunology, Haematology and Transfusion Science (BIS5012-B)

Medical Microbiology (BIS5008-B)

Clinical and Analytical Biochemistry (BIS5013-B)

Molecular Genetics (BIS5014-B)

Pathology (BIS5015-B)

Final year

Core

Biomedical Science Research Project (BIS6026-D)

Medical Genetics (BIS6011-B)

Biology of Disease (BIS6012-B)

Plus 1 of the following:

Research Topics 1 in Medical Cell Biology (BIS6006-B)

Research Topics 1 in Medical Biochemistry (BIS6009-B)

Research Topics 1 in Cancer Biology and Therapeutics (BIS6007-B)

Research Topics 1 in Medical Microbiology (BIS6008-B)

Research Topics 1 in Haematology and Transfusion Science (BIS6013-B)

Option

Research Topics 2 (BIS6010-B)

Career support

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Employment statistics

92% of our 2017 BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science graduates found employment or went on to further study within six months of graduating.*

Salary expectations

The average starting salary for our 2017 BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science graduates was £19,875.*

*These DLHE statistics are derived from annually published data by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), based on those UK domiciled graduates who are available for employment or further study and whose destinations are known.

Career prospects

You will graduate with scientific, experimental and critical skills highly valued in graduate careers. You can apply your specialist skills and knowledge towards research in either medical or industrial research organisations (such as pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies), or universities and research institutes.

Openings exist in medical research (hospitals, universities or research institutes), the pharmaceutical industry, medical information services, teaching, medical writing and publishing. The course also provides essential transferable skills for non-science-based graduate employment.

Many graduates also undertake postgraduate study (medical degrees, Master’s level or PhD level qualifications).

Others seek a more vocational qualification in dietetics or health service management.

Recent graduates have taken up positions as:

  • Biomedical Scientist – various NHS trusts
  • Cytology Screener – NHS
  • Experimental Officer; Lab Technician – Covance
  • Haemostasis Technical Assistant – Helena Biosciences Europe
  • Microbiologist – Arla
  • Scientist – Vectura Plc
  • Teaching Support Technician – University of Leeds

For more information, see NHS Careers.

Learning and assessment

Formal lectures will facilitate your acquisition of knowledge and understanding and discipline specific skills.  Laboratory sessions run in conjunction with the theoretical components will give you the opportunity to enhance your understanding of particular topics.

You will be examined, primarily, on the breadth of knowledge via MCQ and short answer examinations. Coursework assignments will give you the opportunity to gain experience in report writing and data handling and interpretation. As you progress through the programme you will have the opportunity to demonstrate increasing skills of analysis, synthesis and criticism through a wide variety of assessment strategies, including written and oral examinations, report writing, case studies, group work, essays, including a dissertation, oral presentations and the project report. The project report provides a major opportunity to demonstrate autonomy in data handling and critical interpretation in a research context.

Course assessment

The majority of modules contain exam and coursework assessment, particularly important for a laboratory based science course. Overall 48% of the course is assessed by coursework. The percentage assessment by coursework increases on progression through the course to reflect development of independent laboratory and study skills.

 

 

 

 

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Archaeology BSc (Hons) – University of Bradford

Subject Area:       Archaeology

Level:                   Undergraduate

Method:                Lecture, Seminar

University:           University of Bradford

Country:               United Kingdom

City:                     Bradford

 

Overview

Our degree in Archaeology integrates traditional archaeology with the practical application of scientific methods that are applied to today’s archaeology.

It is a professionally-focused degree in archaeology with a strong fieldwork component and a focus on human osteology or the environment.

Your degree pathway in the second and final years will comprise a number of compulsory core modules that characterise this combination of archaeology and applied archaeological science. We offer a number of clear pathways, which will provide you with a specialism in, for example, prehistoric archaeology or in cultural resource management.

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (CIfA) and University Archaeology UK (UAUK).

 

Rankings

We are ranked in the top 200 universities in the world for Archaeology in the 2019 QS World University Rankings by subject.

 

Entry requirements

 

Typical offer – 112 UCAS tariff points.

We take into consideration a number of factors when assessing your application. It’s not just about your grades; we take the time to understand your personal circumstances and make decisions based on your potential to thrive at university and beyond.

A levels

There are no specific subject requirements.

BTEC Extended Diploma

DMM — there are no specific subject requirements.

Applicants on Access Programmes

112 UCAS tariff points from an Access to Higher Education Diploma.

International Baccalaureate requirements

112 UCAS tariff points to include at least 80 points from 2 HL subjects.

Plus HL 3 or SL 4 in Maths and English Language and Literature A or English B.

Plus minimum of

GCSE English at grade C or 4 (equivalents accepted).

English language requirements

Minimum IELTS at 6.0 or the equivalent.

If you do not meet the IELTS requirement, you can take a University of Bradford pre-sessional English course.

CIFS entry requirement

If you are an International student and do not meet the entry requirements for direct entry onto this course you may be interested in our Certificate of International Foundation Studies

80 UCAS points or equivalent.

UKVI approved IELTS of 5.0 overall with no sub-test less than 5.0.

CIFS modules to be taken

Students study the four core modules plus TWO of the following modules:

  • Foundation in Human Biology
  • Foundation in Chemistry
  • Introduction to the Social Sciences
  • Global Business Environment
  • Foundation Mathematics 2

Progression requirements for degree programme

An overall average of at least 50%.

Course Content

All module information is subject to change.

First year

Core

British Archaeology (ARC4020-B)

Introduction to Archaeological Methods (ARC4018-B)

Biological Anthropology: From Human Evolution to Forensic Anthropology (ARC4021-B)

Scientific Frameworks (ARC4013-B)

Field Recording Skills (ARC4022-B)

Themes in World Archaeology (ARC4015-B)

Second year

Core

Archaeological Fieldwork (ARC5024-B)

Interpreting the Past (ARC5025-B)

Heritage Management with GIS (ARC5016-B)

Option

Understanding Artefacts (ARC5026-B)

Prehistoric Societies (ARC5027-B)

Celts, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings (ARC5028-B)

Bioarchaeology: Humans, Plants and Animals (ARC5029-B)

Elective

Final year

Core

Dissertation (ARC6025-D)

Archaeology in Contemporary Society (ARC6031-B)

Option

Advanced Archaeological Fieldwork (ARC6028-B)

Current Research in Archaeological Sciences (ARC6029-B)

Bones, Bodies and Burials (ARC6030-B)

Landscapes, Climate and Society (ARC6032-B)

Elective

Career prospects

Almost half our recent graduates have entered archaeologically-related careers – one of the highest rates in the UK.

Former students have become field archaeologists, cultural resource managers, university lecturers and even accountants.

Other career opportunities include computing, management, or teaching, and many areas where employers are looking for transferable skills and an analytical mind.

Many graduates choose to continue their education and enrol on taught Master’s or research degrees.

Employment statistics

100% of our 2017 School of Archaeological Sciences graduates found employment or went on to further study within six months of graduating.*

Salary expectations

The average starting salary for our 2017 School of Archaeological Sciences graduates was £21,667.*

*These DLHE statistics are derived from annually published data by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), based on those UK domiciled graduates who are available for employment or further study and whose destinations are known.

Learning and assessment

Stage 1 introduces you to a range of archaeological periods, regions and materials, and the development of archaeology as a discipline. Practical modules such as Introduction to Archaeological Methods and Field Recording Skills allow you to handle real archaeological materials and explore methods of field survey and the principles of stratigraphy. Through the Scientific Frameworks module, you are also introduced to the main scientific techniques used in modern archaeology.

Stage 2 develops your critical thinking and offers an element of optionality in your studies. Participation in Archaeological Fieldwork is allocated by a CV and letter of application and allows first-hand experience of excavation and recording, enabling you to make own decisions under supervision. Understanding Artefacts logically follows the excavation stage and demonstrates the processes needed to understand archaeological artefacts and how they inform wider archaeological debates. Heritage Management with GIS follows British Archaeology in examining the legal and financial context of the discipline.

Other optional modules complement the core modules examining ethical and scientific issues (Bioarchaeology: Humans, Plants and Animals) and cultural archaeology from the Palaeolithic to the Viking period (Prehistoric Societies; Celts, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings).

Stage 3 develops your critical thinking further, and allows greater self-learning through the Dissertation. Bones, Bodies and Burials builds on Biological Anthropology: From Human Evolution to Forensic Anthropology (stage 1) and Bioarchaeology: Humans, Plants and Animals and Interpreting Archaeology (stage 2) to permit the detailed study of human remains in their cultural context.

Assessment methods include:

  • essays
  • portfolios
  • worksheets
  • critiques
  • laboratory reports
  • group-work
  • poster (in the placement year)
  • oral presentations
  • research designs
  • reflective journals
  • examinations

The research design and dissertation develops your ability to undertake independent research and plan this research effectively.

 

 

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